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(2) The following periodization should serve as the framework for the organization of this course: 8000 BC-500 BC (Development of River Valley Civilizations); 500 BC-AD 600 (Classical Era); 600-1450 (Post-classical Era); 1450-1750 (Connecting Hemispheres); 1750-1914 (Age of Revolutions); and 1914-present (20th Century to the Present).Specific events and processes may transcend these chronological boundaries.Students examine the impact of constitutional issues on American society, evaluate the dynamic relationship of the three branches of the federal government, and analyze efforts to expand the democratic process.Students describe the relationship between the arts and popular culture and the times during which they were created.(7) State and federal laws mandate a variety of celebrations and observances, including Celebrate Freedom Week. The student is expected to: (A) analyze the causes and effects of changing demographic patterns resulting from migration within the United States, including western expansion, rural to urban, the Great Migration, and the Rust Belt to the Sun Belt; and (B) analyze the causes and effects of changing demographic patterns resulting from legal and illegal immigration to the United States. The student understands the relationship between population growth and modernization on the physical environment. The student is expected to: (A) describe how the economic impact of the Transcontinental Railroad and the Homestead Act contributed to the close of the frontier in the late 19th century; (B) describe the changing relationship between the federal government and private business, including the costs and benefits of laissez-faire, anti-trust acts, the Interstate Commerce Act, and the Pure Food and Drug Act; (C) explain how foreign policies affected economic issues such as the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, the Open Door Policy, Dollar Diplomacy, and immigration quotas; (D) describe the economic effects of international military conflicts, including the Spanish-American War and World War I, on the United States; and (E) describe the emergence of monetary policy in the United States, including the Federal Reserve Act of 1913 and the shifting trend from a gold standard to fiat money. The student understands significant economic developments between World War I and World War II. The student is expected to: (A) describe the economic effects of World War II on the home front such as the end of the Great Depression, rationing, and increased opportunity for women and minority employment; (B) identify the causes of prosperity in the 1950s, including the Baby Boom and the impact of the GI Bill (Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944), and the effects of prosperity in the 1950s such as increased consumption and the growth of agriculture and business; (C) describe the economic impact of defense spending on the business cycle and education priorities from 1945 to the 1990s; (D) identify actions of government and the private sector such as the Great Society, affirmative action, and Title IX to create economic opportunities for citizens and analyze the unintended consequences of each; and (E) describe the dynamic relationship between U. The student is expected to: (A) evaluate the impact of New Deal legislation on the historical roles of state and federal government; (B) explain constitutional issues raised by federal government policy changes during times of significant events, including World War I, the Great Depression, World War II, the 1960s, and 9/11; (C) describe the effects of political scandals, including Teapot Dome, Watergate, and Bill Clinton's impeachment, on the views of U. citizens concerning trust in the federal government and its leaders; (D) discuss the role of contemporary government legislation in the private and public sectors such as the Community Reinvestment Act of 1977, USA PATRIOT Act of 2001, and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009; and (E) evaluate the pros and cons of U. participation in international organizations and treaties. The student is expected to: (A) describe the impact of events such as the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution and the War Powers Act on the relationship between the legislative and executive branches of government; and (B) evaluate the impact of relationships among the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government, including Franklin D. The student is expected to: (A) analyze the effects of landmark U. The student is expected to: (A) use a variety of both primary and secondary valid sources to acquire information and to analyze and answer historical questions; (B) analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing and contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations, making predictions, drawing inferences, and drawing conclusions; (C) understand how historians interpret the past (historiography) and how their interpretations of history may change over time; (D) use the process of historical inquiry to research, interpret, and use multiple types of sources of evidence; (E) evaluate the validity of a source based on language, corroboration with other sources, and information about the author, including points of view, frames of reference, and historical context; (F) identify bias in written, oral, and visual material; (G) identify and support with historical evidence a point of view on a social studies issue or event; and (H) use appropriate skills to analyze and interpret social studies information such as maps, graphs, presentations, speeches, lectures, and political cartoons. The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms.ach social studies class shall include, during Celebrate Freedom Week as provided under the TEC, 29.907, or during another full school week as determined by the board of trustees of a school district, appropriate instruction concerning the intent, meaning, and importance of the Declaration of Independence and the U. Constitution, including the Bill of Rights, in their historical contexts. The student is expected to: (A) identify the effects of population growth and distribution on the physical environment; (B) identify the roles of governmental entities and private citizens in managing the environment such as the establishment of the National Park System, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Endangered Species Act; and (C) understand the effects of governmental actions on individuals, industries, and communities, including the impact on Fifth Amendment property rights. The student understands domestic and foreign issues related to U. The student is expected to: (A) analyze causes of economic growth and prosperity in the 1920s, including Warren Harding's Return to Normalcy, reduced taxes, and increased production efficiencies; (B) identify the causes of the Great Depression, including the impact of tariffs on world trade, stock market speculation, bank failures, and the monetary policy of the Federal Reserve System; (C) analyze the effects of the Great Depression on the U. economy and society such as widespread unemployment and deportation and repatriation of people of European and Mexican heritage and others; (D) compare the New Deal policies and its opponents' approaches to resolving the economic effects of the Great Depression; and (E) describe how various New Deal agencies and programs, including the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, the Securities and Exchange Commission, and the Social Security Administration, continue to affect the lives of U. The student is expected to: (A) create written, oral, and visual presentations of social studies information; (B) use correct social studies terminology to explain historical concepts; and (C) use different forms of media to convey information, including written to visual and statistical to written or visual, using available computer software as appropriate. The student uses geographic tools to collect, analyze, and interpret data.(5) A greater depth of understanding of complex content material can be attained by integrating social studies content and skills and by analyzing connections between and among historical periods and events.The list of events and people in this course curriculum should not be considered exhaustive.

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The course content is based on the founding documents of the U. government, which provide a framework for its heritage.

Implementation of Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Social Studies, High School, Beginning with School Year 2011-2012.

The provisions of 113.41-113.48 of this subchapter shall be implemented by school districts beginning with the 2011-2012 school year.

The study of the Declaration of Independence must include the study of the relationship of the ideas expressed in that document to subsequent American history, including the relationship of its ideas to the rich diversity of our people as a nation of immigrants, the American Revolution, the formulation of the U. Constitution, and the abolitionist movement, which led to the Emancipation Proclamation and the women's suffrage movement. The student understands the principles included in the Celebrate Freedom Week program. The student is expected to: (A) identify the major characteristics that define an historical era; (B) identify the major eras in U. history from 1877 to the present and describe their defining characteristics; (C) apply absolute and relative chronology through the sequencing of significant individuals, events, and time periods; and (D) explain the significance of the following years as turning points: 1898 (Spanish-American War), 1914-1918 (World War I), 1929 (the Great Depression begins), 1939-1945 (World War II), 1957 (Sputnik launch ignites U. lands on the moon), 1991 (Cold War ends), 2001 (terrorist attacks on World Trade Center and the Pentagon), and 2008 (election of first black president, Barack Obama). The student understands the political, economic, and social changes in the United States from 1877 to 1898. The student is expected to: (A) create thematic maps, graphs, and charts representing various aspects of the United States; and (B) pose and answer questions about geographic distributions and patterns shown on maps, graphs, charts, and available databases. The student uses problem-solving and decision-making skills, working independently and with others, in a variety of settings.

(B) Each school district shall require that, during Celebrate Freedom Week or other week of instruction prescribed under subparagraph (A) of this paragraph, students in Grades 3-12 study and recite the following text: "We hold these Truths to be self-evident, that all Men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness--That to secure these Rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just Powers from the Consent of the Governed." (8) Students identify and discuss how the actions of U. citizens and the local, state, and federal governments have either met or failed to meet the ideals espoused in the founding documents. The student is expected to: (A) analyze and evaluate the text, intent, meaning, and importance of the Declaration of Independence and the U. Constitution, including the Bill of Rights, and identify the full text of the first three paragraphs of the Declaration of Independence; (B) analyze and evaluate the application of these founding principles to historical events in U. history; and (C) explain the contributions of the Founding Fathers such as Benjamin Rush, John Hancock, John Jay, John Witherspoon, John Peter Muhlenberg, Charles Carroll, and Jonathan Trumbull Sr. The student understands traditional historical points of reference in U. S.-Soviet space race), 1968-1969 (Martin Luther King Jr. The student is expected to: (A) analyze political issues such as Indian policies, the growth of political machines, civil service reform, and the beginnings of Populism; (B) analyze economic issues such as industrialization, the growth of railroads, the growth of labor unions, farm issues, the cattle industry boom, the rise of entrepreneurship, free enterprise, and the pros and cons of big business; (C) analyze social issues affecting women, minorities, children, immigrants, urbanization, the Social Gospel, and philanthropy of industrialists; and (D) describe the optimism of the many immigrants who sought a better life in America. The student understands the emergence of the United States as a world power between 18. The student is expected to: (A) identify reasons for U. involvement in World War II, including Italian, German, and Japanese dictatorships and their aggression, especially the attack on Pearl Harbor; (B) evaluate the domestic and international leadership of Franklin D. The student is expected to: (A) use a problem-solving process to identify a problem, gather information, list and consider options, consider advantages and disadvantages, choose and implement a solution, and evaluate the effectiveness of the solution; and (B) use a decision-making process to identify a situation that requires a decision, gather information, identify options, predict consequences, and take action to implement a decision.

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